633. No Good Read Goes Unpunished

Original airdate: April 8, 2018

The premise:
Bart seeks to wear down his father’s spirits to get whatever he wants using tactics from The Art of War. Meanwhile, Marge is disillusioned to find her favorite childhood book is a bit more culturally insensitive than she remembered.

The reaction: I’m gonna be exclusively talking about the B-plot here, since there’s a lot to unpack and I really don’t have anything to comment on the Bart story, so let’s go. At an old bookstore, Marge finds “The Princess in the Garden,” and is excited to share this old favorite bedtime story to her daughter, but she’s less excited in reading it, finding it’s full to the brim of horribly offensive and degrading stereotypes. What’s a mother to do? This storyline is the show’s direct response to comedian Hari Kondabalu’s The Problem With Apu documentary, wherein he talks about his feelings about the Apu character as a harmful stereotypical portrayal, talking with the likes of Kal Penn, Aasfi Mandvi, Whoopi Goldberg and others about ethnic stereotypes in pop culture and how they affect those groups. I’d highly recommend it to anyone reading this blog, and it’s definitely worth seeing to inform your reaction to this storyline. Marge and Lisa act as the show’s mouthpieces for their views on the matter, and they are quite… tactless, to put it kindly.

Let’s break this plot down: upon revisiting this beloved story of her past, Marge is horrified to find it full of very insensitive and denigrative portrayals of different ethnic groups, things she never really picked up on when she was a child. This in itself is very rich material to mine from, how nostalgia can whitewash our view of the past and how we want to sweep problematic elements of the things we love under the rug so we don’t have to re-evaluate them. Marge’s solution is to stay up all night and Post-It note the fuck out of the book, recreating it (she comments, ““It takes a lot of work to take the spirit and character out of a book, but now it’s as inoffensive as a Sunday in Cincinnati!”) Trying to make the book more palatable to a modern audience (Lisa), Marge rewrites the entire book, now about a “cisgendered girl” living in South America who rescues horses and fights for net neutrality. Her new protagonist is now effectively a flawless Mary Sue character, leaving Lisa to point out, “But since she’s already evolved, she doesn’t really have an emotional journey to complete, it kinda means there’s no point to the book.” This leads directly into the back-and-forth conversation I transcribed above. So let’s talk about this: the writers view the “Apu problem” as being the crest of a slippery slope, that removing the problematic elements of a narrative means robbing it of its soul and meaning. They also appear to be equating “ethnic stereotypes” with “character flaws,” in that a politically correct fantasy story involves no conflict or personal growth. This all feels like more of the writers’ tone-deaf portrayal of those accursed rabble-rousing SJWs, like that scintillating writing we saw in the Burns University episode. I understand that it’s supposed to be an exaggerated alternative, but it still feels pretty ridiculous.

Lisa is not receptive to this version either, leaving a distressed Marge to ask, “What am I supposed to do?” “It’s hard to say,” Lisa replies, then directly turns to camera. “Something that started decades ago and was applauded and inoffensive, is now politically incorrect.” She then looks to her bedside table, which contains a framed photo of Apu. “What can you do?” “Some things will be dealt with at a later date,” Marge comments. “If at all,” Lisa adds, as they both look to camera. The kicker of this whole scene is Lisa lamenting how a character once “applauded and inoffensive” is now considered politically incorrect. Forget the fact that it’s liberal mouthpiece Lisa crying about SJW PC culture, but it’s basically the show saying we never personally found Apu offensive, so that means he isn’t. That the outrage about this character is a brand new invention, rather than only coming about due to underrepresented voices finally having a small portion of the media spotlight to talk about their long-held feelings. It’s less of the writers not understanding any of the points made in and around the documentary, and more of them saying they don’t particularly care that much, and we may or may not actually do something about this if we feel like it. What a stance.

I think this entire controversy is exemplary of a large issue, in that The Simpsons as a show is completely anachronistic in our present day. The show was originally created as a response to bland, limp-wristed sitcoms of the 1980s, featuring a classic Americana 1950s-style nuclear family. Its rude and outlandish characters and biting social satire certainly stood out in a sea of “safe” shows like Full House or Home Improvement. But as time went on, as the show entered the 2000s, then the 2010s (and very soon, the 2020s), the television landscape changed. Culture itself is ever evolving, In addition to this off-kilter show becoming widely respected and accepted (counter-culture becoming culture), it had outlived the very shows it was lampooning in the first place. But rather than grow or change to counter this, or redirect focus and progress, the show retreated backwards, handicapping itself to its pre-established world and Flanderizing everyone in the cast with it. This is a show that hasn’t budged an inch in over a decade; while we see characters using smartphones and the occasional storyline about a current issue or trend, the characters, the setting, the comedy rhythms, the types of jokes, all completely stagnant and unwavering. It’s a show trapped in time, with no desire to change or attempt to reinvent itself, and you just can’t do that when you’re pushing your thirtieth season. Just look at the show’s complete inaction regarding a post-Mrs. Krabappel Springfield Elementary. Marcia Wallace’s final speaking role was in 2014, and Bart still has yet to receive a new fourth grade teacher. This is a bit of an extreme example, but rather than actually create a new character and explore different dynamics within a major setting of the show, the writers decided just not to bother. It’s easier just to not show a teacher in Bart’s class anymore, or if an adult it needed, throw Skinner and Chalmers in there to do their tired old schtick. Growth is hard, and this is a show that has proven time and time again that it just doesn’t want to bother trying new things, let along rethink old ones.

The character of Apu was created in an entirely different, much, much, much whiter pop culture climate. I mean, The Simpsons premiered a few years following the Short Circuit movies, where no movie producers or executives seemed to have an issue with a white actor donning brownface to play an Indian, while actual Indian actors were extremely hard to come by on mainstream television and film. I feel like Apu has more dimension and nuance to him that elevates him beyond a baseline stereotype, and there are plenty of jokes involving him in the classic seasons that are based in his unique character and not just being a rote stereotype. But, at the end of the day, he’s still a jolly servile Indian convenience store employee voiced by a white guy doing an exaggerated accent; the character is rooted in a seemingly innocent, but still present smidgen of racism. It also certainly didn’t help that over the years, like the rest of the cast, Apu became more of a one-dimensional stock character, and there were plenty of cringe-worthy gags where the only “joke” is him acting like a wacky foreigner, speaking in tongues, dancing a funny Indian dance, and so on and so forth.

The fact of the matter is Apu was always offensive. It certainly wasn’t offensive to the room of white guys who wrote the character, or Hank Azaria who rattled off the thick Indian accent to the guffaws of said writers, or to myself and throngs of other white fans who love the character. But to Hari Kondabalu and multitudes of other Indian-Americans, they don’t agree, and their viewpoints and rationales are valid, and worthy of listening to and understanding. There certainly wasn’t any malice or abusive intent in the creation of Apu, but in a modern context with more unheard voices at the public megaphone being able to speak their piece, he certainly is a character worthy of re-evaluation. Whether or not this storyline was just a stop gap acknowledgement before this gets “dealt with at a later date” as Marge claims, this episode really did feel like the show telling Kondabalu and company to go fuck themselves. His arguments, and the discussions that followed the documentary, all completely dismissed with the reductive rhetoric of saying people nowadays are too overly sensitive and PC. Since the episode aired, Al Jean has retweeted a few reactions from fans applauding their slam on political correctness. “Loved how you guys handled this non-issue,” one viewer complimented. “People just want to cry about everything nowadays b/c it makes them feel like they’re doing something. Don’t ever change!” Well, the show hasn’t changed in over fifteen years, why start now?

One good line/moment: Fuck it.

In closing, this brilliant tweet:

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31 responses to “633. No Good Read Goes Unpunished

  1. The problem I have with the controversy isn’t Hari exactly, it’s the non-Indians who are offended by this, like professional laughingstock Bob Chipman claiming it’s causing “actual harm”. Makes me wonder how they’d react if they took the time to focus on those professors at the end of the episode who claim the author was a lesbian and needed hard whisky to think.

    As for the Bart plot, it was a bit of a clusterfuck in and of itself between Willie killing Nelson (which is another thing, why single out Apu when the show’s got dozens of stereotypes?), Homer’s Flanders phase and the Minecraft “parody” that was the focus until the Flanders thing.

    • “why single out Apu when the show’s got dozens of stereotypes?”

      Because even if someone like Willie is a stereotype of Scots, he wasn’t/isn’t the most visible portrayal of Scottish people in mainstream media up to the point. He also wasn’t a non-white, foreign character voiced by an American white guy doing a “funny” accent.

      Also, saying “why complain about this thing when there are other things” is a pretty poor argument

      • Jebus_Kwijibo

        “Also, saying “why complain about this thing when there are other things” is a pretty poor argument”
        How so? It’s true, isn’t it? In a world where SJWs exist and ruin nearly everything they come in contact with, Why would they just focus their attention on just one character and not every one of them?” Why not complain about how everyone else’s yellow skin is racist towards the Asian race and the Asians being white offensive to whites?

        But you have to admit, the people bitching about this sort of thing are just stupid and want attention.

    • The reason why “why complain about this thing when there are other things” is a poor argument is because it’s not saying anything about the argument. It’s not really saying anything at all. Why are you so confused why these Indian people have a problem with this Indian character? Why do you think they should also complain about this Scottish character or this overly Christian character? Because those characters have nothing at all to do with them. Plus you’re kind of forgetting the context of all the arguments, and the differences in how each character is portrayed. In the end though, you’re agreeing with them, because you’re still saying it’s a problem.

      Congratulations. You’re an SJW.

      • Jebus_Kwijibo

        How the fuck does that make me a SJW? I hate these fuckers overreacting about a cartoon character. Racist or not, Hari and the fools bitching about this are the dumbasses who want this attention. The fact they think it’s causing physical harm to them is even more laughable when you think about it.

        So no, I’m not trying to be an SJW. I’m trying to rationalize why THESE SJWs are being complete, narrow-minded retards for even bringing it up in the first place.

      • I don’t know where you’re getting this “physical harm” narrative from. And I don’t understand how people expressing their discomfort and hurt over a character from an influential cultural institution they find problematic makes them ‘retards.’ There are always Internet rabble-rousers that just want to stir the pot and scream hyperbolic rhetoric on behalf of any controversy, but Kondabalu, those he interviewed, and many, many others have genuine thoughts and opinions that are valid and worth listening to.

      • Jebus_Kwijibo

        Look, I get that they don’t like Apu (as stupid as it is to be offended over a cartoon while being a fully grown adult may be). But at the same time, did he need an entire documentary going on about it? That’s the thing sites like 4Chan’s /co/ and KiwiFarms are, as untrustworthy they may be, asking.

        For that matter, what about people like MovieBob, who are infamous for saying stupid things, and are jumping on the “Apu hate” bandwagon because they want their voices heard (this is where I got the actual/physical harm thing from)? Do you support people like him?

      • The documentary is not just ninety minutes of him whining about Apu, he’s using the character to talk about underrepresentation and harmful stereotypes used in pop culture. It’s entertainment, yes, but our media reflects us as a people and influences how we look at the world, and representation matters. For Indian-Americans, we’ve only just recently seen the likes of Mindy Kaling and Aziz Ansari gain prominence, but for a good period of time, the most famous Indian pop culture icon was a convenience store clerk voiced by a white guy doing a goofy exaggerated accent. Doesn’t that seem a little reductive?

      • Jebus_Kwijibo

        “but for a good period of time, the most famous Indian pop culture icon was a convenience store clerk voiced by a white guy doing a goofy exaggerated accent. Doesn’t that seem a little reductive?”
        To an extent. But 90 minutes is kind of stretching it for a documentary about the subject. I can see why he might be offended about a white guy voicing an Indian (though that raises the question as to where these people were when Hank started voicing Luigi or in regards to Lou and Carl, due to them being black). But once other people who clearly aren’t Indian like Kondabalu start joining the bandwagon (such as MovieBob), it gets kind of hard to take seriously. Sure people have their opinons, but many of them are either parroting Hari or just saying bullshit to justify their biases.

      • People on the Internet are dog piling on an issue and being super hyperbolic? I’m shocked. You get that with every single thing talked about online ever. It sounds like you seem to agree at least in part with Apu being problematic, I don’t get why you’re splitting hairs about how long the documentary is or what a bunch of dumb people online are saying.

      • Jebus_Kwijibo

        Length is subjective I agree, but the internet thing is something I see pretty much everywhere, so it’s kind of hard to ignore with how prevalent it is on social media and elsewhere.

  2. “In a world where SJWs exist and ruin nearly everything they come in contact with,”

    Yes, how dare people bring up how certain societal views are problematic and demeaning towards minorities. “Segregation is illegal and gay marriage is allowed. Damn SJWs!”

    “Why would they just focus their attention on just one character and not every one of them?”

    Because Hari and others bringing up issues with Apu are Indian and have an authority to speak on the matter? (That’s not to say you have to be of a certain ethnicity or minority status to understand certain portrayals are demeaning. Hari might understand Willie or Bumblebee Man are stereotypes, but they’re not stereotypes that have affected people negatively to the extent Apu does. If we’re talking about non-white characters, Bumblebee Man is far less prominent than Apu on the show and outside of his “22 Short Films” segment, there’s relatively little dealing with stereotypes regarding Mexican culture. (But that’s certainly a discussion that can be had).

    “Why not complain about how everyone else’s yellow skin is racist towards the Asian race and the Asians being white offensive to whites?”

    Because the only people who think of still think of Asians as “yellow” are nonagenarians and it’s clear that the yellow skin is supposed to represent Caucasians? If anyone is offended by the Asians being “white”, the Trump rally is thataway.

    “But you have to admit, the people bitching about this sort of thing are just stupid and want attention.”

    No, we don’t.

  3. I’m not gonna really comment on the Apu controversy itself in part because I neither watched this episode nor “The Problem With Apu”. (I also don’t want to be one of those white liberals who gets actively offended on behalf of other ethnic groups – although Kondabolu has the right to analyze the impact of a show he grew up with as he sees fit.) However, I actually read the description of the dialogue and played that tweet at the end…

    …my god.

    I know this is a critique levied by Simpsons review blogs in regards to the modern era, but that dialogue is wretched. Besides being strident in its message, humans don’t talk like that – it seems like something that would belong on SNL’s cutting room. And the voice acting makes me think that Yeardley Smith and Julie Kravner have emotionally checked out of the show, it sounds so stilted. Agree or disagree with the message, the sheer incompetence of the execution has gutted any impact it might have had. As a contrast, I could buy Lisa’s rant in “Lisa v. Malibu Stacy” because Smith put her all into that rant and the dialogue sounded like something a human would say

    That, I think, makes this already heated debate about the state of Apu’s character particularly telling. The same writers who are trying to defend (or at least address) Apu’s character can’t write dialogue anymore, have gutted practically every character of likability, rely on plot cliches that the show once scorned, can barely even string together a coherent story even with those cliches, flop around trying to stay relevant by bringing on celebrities that the writers admire, and haven’t even tried to fix problems brought up time and time again, instead calling the viewers that still watch this show whiny, pedantic suckers who are basically their piggy banks. Why, exactly, should we buy their argument, if they even have an argument?

    Jean and Company have every right to speak their mind. And the fans have every right to dissect it a million ways.

    • (I know I’m a bit late with this, sorry!). I noticed that Smith’s delivery actually sounded like her delivery of Lisa’s “runaway freight train” question in Two Cars in Every Garage and Three Eyes on Every Fish.

  4. Endless Universe

    Great, thorough write-up on this whole issue. I’ve loved Apu and the show since I was a kid, but the stereotypical aspects of the character, coupled with an over the top accent done by a white actor are problematic. Indian people, historically and presently haven’t had the greatest opportunities in Hollywood, nor the best represention. Given the The Simpsons’ popularity, it’s unfortunate that one of the few prominent minority characters has to be tied to those problems.

    Rather than making a mature and thoughtful response to the matter detailed in Hari Kondabolu’s documentary, those working on the show have just brushed it aside. I wouldn’t expect any less from the current product, but it’s disappointing nonetheless.

  5. If this episode were being honest, they works acknowledge that the show should have been cancelled nearly two decades ago.

  6. Fantastic article. As I’ve said in past posts, the Simpsons has been on for so long that saying it’s outlived its shelf life is an understatement. It’s more like the store that carries it has closed down. We’ve not only reached the point where its characters are outdated, but its very premise. Its brand of satire aged out. It started dying post 9/11 as the 90s ended, but the massive cultural shifts since the Great Recession and America’s take on culture and institutions stamped it dead. It’s sort of telling that the last thing anyone really compliments the Simpsons on is the movie…which came out in 2007, at the very tail end of when it still had SOME place in society.

    I wrote 90% of this TV Tropes article. It points out all the ways (or at least all the ways I and a few other people could think of) that the Simpsons has aged out and should have ended at season 8 (or at the very least, anytime in the Scully era).

    http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/TheArtifact/TheSimpsons

  7. I’m not upset at them for taking a “yeah, whatever” stance, or even just dismissing the problem completely. I’m more upset at just how the joke was done. This is one of the laziest jokes/commentaries/whatevers I’ve ever seen in any TV show ever. They literally fucking have the characters LOOK AT THE VIEWER and TELL THEM WHAT’S GOING ON. Then Lisa looks at a picture of Apu by her bed, which she has for some reason. It’s just so…awful. No matter what the commentary is it’s like they put no effort in any way into this “joke”. It’s like…in the very same clip, they’re making fun of a story for removing all the nuances and being safe, and here they are being as safe as they possibly could by treating its viewers like elementary drop-outs and outright telling them what the joke is about, and it feels like they’re passing it off like some intelligent commentary or some shit.
    “On the nose” is an understatement. It’s more like punching your face in. “HERE’S OUR JOKE! DO YOU SEE OUR JOKE YET?!”

    I realize it’s a more minor issue than the Apu thing, but honestly I don’t like being treated like an imbecile. Simpsons has been as unsubtle like this for a long time but this really takes the cake in how “on the nose” they can be.

  8. FOR THE FIRST TIME I totally agree with the ZS writers(but they did it in a stupid way, as always). Saying that now people are more offended because we are more conscious is abominable, and there’s nothing more close-minded than desperately wanting to be open-minded about everything.

    I’m Italian, and I LOVE Luigi’s stereotype, a pizza chef with big mustache that speaks the most stupid stereotyped italian-american language. It’s funny FFS! And I love mafia’s gang for the same reasons.
    When I met people from other countries and they immediately tell me “Italy! Pizza! Mafia! Spaghetti!”(it ALWAYS happens when I travel around the world), do you think I’m happy people make fun of my country? I may get annoyed, but after all, who cares? Those are the rules of the game, it’s normal. You make fun of me, I make fun of you; no hard feelings!
    I mean, about mafia, for example, which would be the most humiliating offense: the history teaches us that they are right to say we are mobsters or something: Italy had and has a lot to do with mafia, it’s horrible but how can I deny it? But I know, and everyone knows, it’s not about 100% of Italian people, so who cares!
    And what about that genius impression of a German woman by Bart? I once met a German who fell in love with the Simpsons after that one. I mean they are just comedy trope, let’s have a laugh! It’s funny cause stereotypes are true in a way or another, and it will always be like that. If you complain about them, you are the first to treat them seriously, and therefore to create a shield between you and other people.

    The Classic Simpsons always been conscious of it, making fun at the stereotype and at the same time at the people who laughed at such a stupid stereotype. IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE MODERN OR OLD SOCIETY, it has to do with the fact that people are not able to take themselves lightly, DESPITE the more consciousness of the modern society(which should lead to the opposite behavior); instead of having a laugh, people complain, and they don’t understand that the more you take yourself seriously and complain about THE OTHERS the more you reinforce differences, instead of laughing together at them. That is all way more detrimental than anything can be said on a TV show.

    • That’s wonderful that you aren’t offended by stereotypes about your culture, but the point of Hari and others argument is that Indians had almost no positive portrayals (or portrayals at all) in media. The best they could do was a cartoon Indian doing the most stereotypical job, voiced by a white guy.

      Broken English-speaking pizza chefs and mobsters might lay heavy into Italian stereotypes, but Italians have had a much longer history of acceptance in American culture compared to foreigners of color.

      • Kaiju no Kami

        Except that is not true at all. There are plenty of Indian people who have no issue with Apu. Hari just decided to be selective on what he showed.

  9. As much as I like Apu, there’s no doubt that he’s a product of another era. While true that since his debut his character grew a lot beyond just an ‘Indian store clerk’ stereotype, I can see why people would have a problem with him, especially in regards to him being voiced by a non-Indian doing a stereotypical Indian voice.

    I think the response to the controversy in this episode wasn’t just limp, but it was also pathetic. I genuinely wonder if they even understood why people may have problems with Apu nowadays, or if they didn’t even care about it to begin with. I imagine a combination of both.

    That’s all I’ve got to say. Not really adding much to the conversation admittedly. Hopefully most people would agree with me since I think I’ve got a fairly nuanced look on the situation.

  10. The tweet at the end of the article sums it up brilliantly.

  11. You know me Marge, I like my beer cold, my TV loud, and my Indian TV characters suhlaaaaaving

  12. Much like “Fears of a Clown”, the Apu plot sounds like it could conceptually be interesting but it sounds like the writers botched it. Badly.

    “Much Apu About Nothing” is still the best Apu-centric episode, and it sounds like this episode is nowhere near that level.

  13. lol Figures, the one episode I haven’t watched yet, is the one that has a huge discussion going on. Now I really need to watch it so I can join in and read your review Mike.

  14. Okay, so I finally watched the episode and it was pretty terrible. Not the worst of the season, as I still chuckled at like two moments, but it was pretty subpar. The whole Bart story was just stupid. However, why the hell was Lisa not up to going to get some new books after her mother suggested it? That was completely out of character for her as she would have jumped at the chance at it.

    I actually did kind of find Marge finding a book she loved as a kid to be quite offensive in reality, but like everything else these days, they took it way too far.

    The worst moment was with the Apu bit. No, I’m sorry, I don’t agree with Apu being the least bit racist. If you are going to look at Apu, then you need to look at the characters that were there for no other reason than be a stereotype like Akira, Bumblebee Man, and Cookie Kwan. Just focusing on Apu is down right bullshit, especially one who has been rich with material and development. He is a college graduate who owns his own store. Saying he is racist because he is an Indian stereotype is crap. Why didn’t anyone care back in 1990? It’s only now that people care because the world’s balls dropped off and everyone has become so afraid of offending someone and other people like that dumbass who did that documentary on Apu are just looking for attention. The documentary was no different than “The People vs George Lucas,” meaning a giant bitchfest by entitled “fans.”

    With that said, the whole Lisa looking at the audience bit was pretty awful. It was a tasteless way to respond to the situation, but given the situation is bogus to begin with, I’m not sure how i feel about it. Nevertheless, that is irrelevant due to it just being a shit episode.

  15. BTW, is NO ONE going to mention how they killed Nelson in this episode?

  16. “The worst moment was with the Apu bit. No, I’m sorry, I don’t agree with Apu being the least bit racist. If you are going to look at Apu, then you need to look at the characters that were there for no other reason than be a stereotype like Akira, Bumblebee Man, and Cookie Kwan. Just focusing on Apu is down right bullshit, especially one who has been rich with material and development. He is a college graduate who owns his own store. Saying he is racist because he is an Indian stereotype is crap. Why didn’t anyone care back in 1990? It’s only now that people care because the world’s balls dropped off and everyone has become so afraid of offending someone and other people like that dumbass who did that documentary on Apu are just looking for attention. The documentary was no different than “The People vs George Lucas,” meaning a giant bitchfest by entitled “fans.”

    With that said, the whole Lisa looking at the audience bit was pretty awful. It was a tasteless way to respond to the situation, but given the situation is bogus to begin with, I’m not sure how i feel about it. Nevertheless, that is irrelevant due to it just being a shit episode.”

    Just wait & see; in future episodes, Apu will be deliberately written as one-dimensional & in order to piss off all of these SJW types who think he’s already problematic at the moment along with us who know better that he’s not Racist but will become such, thus making their criticisms legitimate along with those of us who aren’t SJW’s who will rightfully call out the change in direction but will be smeared with SJW’s in the process, all of this being done in an effort to cater to the Anti-SJW types who are mainly Far-Right & hate Left-Wing Political Correctness. Then again, would you expect any less from Al Jean & the staff, but mostly him, what with them being responsible for the continuation of the sabotage of possibly the most glorious piece of animation ever? Pretty much all they care about nowadays is the celebration of pop-culture & popular trends, one of the most popular at the present time being an Anti-SJW, instead of going against the grain or, dare I say it, being “based”.

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